ICCX Middle East 2017 - Conference Program

26 - 27 November 2017, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates

Precast Concrete Solutions for a Sustainable Environment and Infrastructure

  Jens Fussing ae United Arab Emirates Inspirational precast technology in today’s construction industry in the Middle East
  Manesh Simon ae United Arab Emirates Achieving sustainability in Middle East with modern precast concrete technology
  Dr Stephan Uebachs de Germany Properties of geopolymer concrete and experience with the application
  Prof. Hans Beushausen za South Africa Designing concrete sewer pipes for increased acid resistance
Lunch

Precast Concrete Technology and Innovative Construction Technologies

  Dipl.-Ing. Juergen Glaesle de Germany Concrete Architecture around the globe
  Dr Stephan Hauser de Germany High performance precast façades mastering modern architectural and building physics’ challenges
  Thomas Friedrich de Germany Precast buildings of tomorrow - cool, intelligent and flexible
  Prof. Theo Salet nl Netherlands The future of 3D printing and its applications in the precast concrete industry
Evening event

Concrete Products

  Bernd Büttner ae Germany Development of concrete blocks and pavers according to customers requirements
  Karthik P.K ae United Arab Emirates Quality control of blocks and pavers in the Middle East
  Michael Gerwing de Germany Concrete pavers with triple protection
  Dr Alexander Wetzel de Germany Packing-density optimized face concretes for durable two layered paving slabs
Lunch

Concrete Technology

  Dr Mohamad Nagi ae United Arab Emirates Durability design of concrete structures
  Prof. Hans Beushausen za South Africa Optimizing concrete mix design and production for improved durability and sustainability
  Dr Mohamad Nagi ae United Arab Emirates Manufacture and placement of concrete in hot environments
  Dr Juergen Oecknick chSwitzerland Nano-particles boost the efficiency of construction materials - dreams and reality

Inspirational precast technology in today’s construction industry in the Middle East

Jens has over 24 years’ experience in the design and documentation of a wide range of structures throughout 24 countries, from seismic retrofit in Nepal and Iran, Towers in Europe, Africa and in the Middle East, Sports Stadiums in Azerbaijan, Multi Arenas in Europe to large scale commercial and residential developments in the GCC countries. Jens has particular expertise in high-rise structures, precast building systems and building physics. Jens has experience with exanimating as well as mentoring master and PhD students at university level in relation to research and development projects.

Jens Fussing

Achieving Sustainability in Middle East with Modern Precast Concrete Technology

The topic of sustainability is of ever increasing importance for the concrete industry as it places demands on concrete mix design procedures, production methods and operational maintenance of structures. From an insider point of view, this presentation covers the importance of sustainable construction practice in Middle East and provides related manufacturing and marketing strategies for the regional precast concrete industries. The question is not only what the precast industry should do more to secure its future in Middle East, but how current trends towards sustainability can be used to create a major marketing advantage.

Manesh Simon is Precast Division Manager at NAEL Cement Products. He is responsible for the overall management of a portfolio consisting of 3 precast factories. Factories within the division include a Solid Precast Factory (capacity: 2,700 m2 wall/day), a Hollow Core Factory (capacity: 3,000 m2/day), and a GRE Factory (Glass Reinforced Elements). Projects within the division consist of production, delivery and erection of precast villas, buildings, schools and other precast structures. Nael Cement Products is a leading one stop shop for all concrete products in U.A.E. Manesh Simon holds several university degrees, including an MBA (Operations Management) from Sikkim Manipal University, India, and a B. Tech (Mechanical Engineering) from Mahatma Gandhi University, India. He has been working in the UAE for the past 12 years.

Manesh Simon, NAEL Concrete Products, UAE

Properties of geopolymer concrete and experience with the application

The use of alkali activated binder systems becomes increasingly important in concrete technology. Beside the ecological questions, especially the reduction of the CO2 emissions when producing the binders, special concrete properties can be improved by using these binder systems. Alkali activated binders with lower calcium contents also called “geopolymer”.

The reactions of the binder system required for strength formation differ significantly from the reactions already known from the systems based on Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). Mainly calcium silicate hydrate phases are formed in OPC-based systems, whereas in the use of geopolymer systems, inorganic three-dimensional aluminosilicate networks are formed.

In this paper, results of extensive laboratory tests as well as several practical applications of a geopolymer concrete with a binder system consisting of a ground granulated blast furnace slag, fly ash and custom made chemical activators are presented. To adjust the required consistency, a superplasticiser was used which is especially adapted to the binder system. Concretes which are produced using this binder system feature a high resistance to chemical attack, as e. g. sulphate or acid attack. A high sulphate resistance is often required in the GCC-countries for concrete in direct contact with ground(water). Due to the high acid resistance the geolpolymer concrete can be used especially for pipes and segmental linings for sewer channels, but also for conventional building elements.

UEBACHS, Stephan, Dr. Brameshuber + Uebachs INGENIEURE GmbH, Aachen, Germany

Designing concrete sewer pipes for increased acid resistance

Corrosion rates in precast concrete sewer pipes depend largely on the chemical composition of cementitious binders and microstructural characteristics of concrete mixtures used in the manufacture of the elements. The presentation discusses a study in which sewer pipes with various binder types were subjected to biogenic corrosion mechanisms in an operational sewer environment for several years. The predominant factors affecting the durability of concrete sewer pipes are highlighted and updated service life prediction models are presented, together with guidelines for the manufacture of pipes with increased performance.

Hans Beushausen is Professor in the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Cape Town. He is a member of the Concrete Materials & Structural Integrity Research Unit, which focuses on infrastructure performance and renewal research. His research fields include concrete durability (material aspects, durability testing, durability design and specification), performance assessment of concrete structures, repair systems for concrete structures, and bonded concrete overlays. His interests further include precast concrete technology and he is editor of the magazine Concrete Plant International.

Hans Beushausen, University of Cape Town, South Africa

Concrete Architecture around the globe

Hardly any other building material is in such demand at the moment by architects and is more diverse in use than concrete. This is once again reflected in contemporary architecture. The material that was mostly used previously for construction, has since become an architectural statement of the surface. Concrete as a styling medium and design form of modern architecture is experiencing a true renaissance. Of course not just the aesthetes but also the technologists have taken on the material in the past few years. Concrete technological innovations and developments pave the way for a new exciting future. Self-compacting and ultra-high-performance concretes promise sculptural and filigree constructions and an architecture that could not be built in the past. Glass fibre and textile reinforced or even translucent concrete open up the range of possibilities that concrete architecture offers the planners nowadays. The presentation takes you on a diverse journey through the current concrete architecture to be found around the globe.

Dipl.-Ing. Juergen Glaesle (born 1971) studied structural engineering and architecture in Stuttgart/Germany and Leeds/England. After his studies he worked in various offices in England and Germany. Since 2002 he has been a professional journalist in the concrete sector, since 2005 as the Editor-in-chief of the professional architectural magazine opus C – Concrete Architecture & Design. He is giving lectures and presentations on Concrete Architecture all over the world.

Juergen Glaesle, opus C – Concrete Architecture & Design, Germany

High performance precast façades mastering modern architectural and building physics’ challenges

The high-performance building material Ducon (Ductile Concrete), an ultra-high performance concrete with a three-dimensional micro reinforcement, is distinguished by high ductility and energy absorption, but also by high strength and durability. Its load-bearing capacity and protective effect exceeds twice that of conventional reinforced concrete. Ducon opens up a new dimension for the design language in architecture due to high-quality, durable surfaces that can be freely designed. This enables the realization of lightweight, avant-garde shapes, self-supporting folded stairs, furniture, claddings made of architectural concrete and other architectural elements featuring slender cross-sections and meeting demanding design requirements simultaneously.

Dr. – Ing. Stephan Hauser is Managing Director of DUCON GmbH und DUCON Europe mbH&Co.KG, Moerfelden-Walldorf. He completed his studies of Civil Engineering at the University of Technology Darmstadt. From 1992 – 1995 he was employed by Philipp Holzmann AG as Project Manager in the department of structural engineering. He subsequently obtained his PhD at TU Darmstadt, on the topic of micro-reinforced, ultra-high-performance concrete DUCON. From 1999-2004 Dr. Hauser worked for Hochtief AG as the Head of site-management and Project Manager of large construction sites. In 2004, he established the DUCON GmbH after the international DUCON-patent had been granted.

Stephan Hauser, Ducon, Germany

Precast buildings of tomorrow – cool, intelligent and flexible

In the search for cost-efficient construction, precasting offers the opportunity to assign further functions to structural components from the very beginning. These components and the structures erected with them accordingly have capabilities in addition to their loadbearing function. These include complete climate control by using cold and warm surfaces, utilization of heat storage units for optimal energy management, ventilation ducts built into cross-sections, as well as utility lines for electricity and control of the newly added functions – and much more. Such integration, however, also requires the implementation of new concepts for controlling the newly added functions in order to provide users with an optimal feel-good room climate and to afford them the greatest flexibility for their use. The components integrated into loadbearing components – in connection with coordinated control systems – result in innovative, intelligent constructions. Precasting opens up completely new opportunities for traditional concrete construction methods.

Thomas Friedrich studied Civil Engineering at RWTH Aachen University, Germany, and as a scholar from the German National Academic Foundation at the ETH (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology) Zurich, Switzerland. In 1988 he established the engineering company Domostatik GmbH, Zurich, Switzerland. Since 2008 he has been a lecturer on the topics of pre-stressed components for building construction at the University of Kaiserslautern, Germany. In 2010, Thomas Friedrich established the company Innogration GmbH, Bernkastel-Kues, Germany.

Thomas Friedrich, Innogration GmbH, Bernkastel-Kues, Germany

3D printing in the precast concrete industry

The building industry has started a new era of mass customization, following a period of mass industrialisation. Digital data, resulting from both design and engineering (BIM), will soon be utilised by robots for construction of unique objects. This presentation will put a focus on the usage of robots in 3D printing of concrete. The opportunities in terms of sustainability and productivity will be discussed, as well as the challenges to make the material printable and the concrete structures reinforced. The state of the art of research, as well as the implementation of 3D concrete printing in real projects, will be demonstrated. The experiences so far, all point in the direction of the precast industry as being the early adopters. However, on the longer run it even might disrupt the industry and vanish the difference between in-situ production and precast by bringing the high tech precast technology closer to the construction site.

Theo Salet is a full Professor in the Department of the Build Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) and visiting Professor at the Singapore Centre of 3D Printing (SC3DP) at Nanyang Technological University (NTU). He combines this positions with a partnership at the consulting engineering firm Witteveen+Bos. During his professional carrier, he worked on the design of underground buildings and large scale prefabricated tunnels and bridges like the North South metro line in Amsterdam, the Oresund link between Denmark and Sweden and the Confederation bridge in Canada. He is a member of the board of the Dutch Concrete Association and the chairman of Stufib, the Dutch Association of Structural Engineers in Concrete Structures. His main topic of research is 3D printing of concrete structures, including innovative design, materials testing and numerical modelling of both print process and hardened printed components. He studied structural engineering and obtained his Doctorate of Philosophy from Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.

Theo Salet, Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands

Development of concrete blocks and pavers according to customers requirements

Gardening and landscape architecture has established as a major lifestyle trend in communities and families around the globe. The integration of aesthetically pleasing and functional concrete products offers endless possibilities for architectural design and landscaping of parks, gardens, orchards and rockeries. Production, marketing and custom made design solutions for concrete block and pavers are discussed, highlighting recent trends and modern landscaping solutions.

Bernd Büttner (M.A.) studied architecture at the Fachhochschule Erfurt, focusing on constructive design. After and during his studies, he worked as a design and project architect in various regional and national architectural consultancies. Since 2014, he has been Product Manager at concrete manufacturer F.C. Nüdling Betonelemente GmbH & Co. KG in Fulda.

Bernd Büttner, F.C. Nüdling Betonelemente GmbH & Co. KG, Germany

Quality Control of Blocks and Pavers in the Middle East

The regional concrete product producing industry in the Middle East has the reputation to produce high quality products with superior architectural and mechanical performance. To deliver such high-end products to the client, manufacturers have to pay special attention to requirements for raw materials and production methods. Of particular importance are the various stages of quality control, which have to be implemented based on optimised sampling and testing procedures.

Er. Karthik is currently working as the Assistant Quality Control Manager for Nael Cement Products which consist of 4 concrete block and paver factories, kerb stone factories, solid precast factories, Hollow Core slab factories, GRC/GRP/GRG factories and 8 Readymix concrete plants. His technical expertise includes concrete mix design and quality control based on international standards, high strength and self compacting concrete, paving blocks and precast elements with special finishes, lightweight concrete and other special concretes such as FRC, underwater concrete, water resistant concrete and slip form concrete.

Karthik, B.E., Nael Cement Products, UAE

Concrete pavers with triple protection

The production of concrete pavers as a mass product with consistently high quality requires manufacturers to adopt efficient technologies and quality assurance strategies. Pricing pressures in a competitive industry can best be met with innovative technology coupled with a perfect understanding of clients’ requirements. The German company Gerwing developed a new concrete product with superior aesthetics and durability properties. Manufacturing technology and marketing strategies for this successful product will be introduced.

 

Michael Gerwing, Gerwing Steinwerke GmbH, Germany

Packing-density optimized face concretes for durable two layered paving slabs

Ultra-high performance concretes were optimised for the application of two layered concrete paving slabs. One is based on ordinary Portland cement, the other is based on alkali-activated material. The basic mixes reach compressive strength values defining them as ultra-high performance concretes. The efflorescence potential is reduced and the resistance against physico-chemical impact is increased compared to standard face concretes due to the very low capillary porosity. Both face concretes were adjusted in rheological properties for the use in a hermetic press and the chemical compositions were developed to reduce efflorescence. The abrasion resistance, freeze-thaw resistance and microstructural aspects were tested for both mentioned mixes. Further improvements could be found by intentional carbonation, which was tested under controlled conditions in a CO2-reactor.

Dr. Alexander Wetzel studied geoscience at the Georg August University in Goettingen with the main focus on applied mineralogy. He received his PhD at the Institute of Geology at the University of Berne. Since 2011 he is lecturer at the Department of Structural Materials and Construction Chemistry at the University of Kassel.

Alexander Wetzel, University Kassel, Germany

Durability design of concrete structures

Durability study becomes part of the design methodologies of reinforced concrete structures. Considering the high initial construction cost, developers and authorities are demanding much longer service life for their structures (75 to 100 years or more) with minimum maintenance and life cycle cost. Service life of concrete structures is mainly controlled by exposure conditions and concrete durability characteristics such as corrosion and sulfate attack. Production of durable and quality concrete is the key to extending the service life of the structures.

 

Mohamad Nagi, American University in Dubai, UAE

Optimizing concrete mix design and production for improved durability and sustainability

The European concrete mix design standards are largely of the prescriptive type, i.e. recipe-based specifications that prescribe limiting values for certain mix design parameters, such as minimum cement content and maximum water/binder ratio. A dominant assumption among professionals in the industry is that the durability of a concrete mixture is directly proportional to its compressive strength. This may result in uneconomical, unsustainable and often non-durable concretes due to various implications of high cement contents, such as thermal effects, higher risks of alkali-silica reaction, durability problems associated with higher paste contents, etc. Durability should rather be designed for by selecting suitable binder types and exercising good workmanship during concrete manufacture.

Hans Beushausen is Professor in the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Cape Town. He is a member of the Concrete Materials & Structural Integrity Research Unit, which focuses on infrastructure performance and renewal research. His research fields include concrete durability (material aspects, durability testing, durability design and specification), performance assessment of concrete structures, repair systems for concrete structures, and bonded concrete overlays. His interests further include precast concrete technology and he is editor of the magazine Concrete Plant International.

Hans Beushausen, University of Cape Town, South Africa

Manufacture and placement of concrete in hot environments

Hot weather environments such as those experienced in the Middle East create specific challenges for mixing, placing and curing concrete. Fresh concrete properties such as workability, slump retention, setting times and early age deformations are affected by high temperatures and need to be controlled through proper mix design and manufacturing techniques. Common challenges experienced in the local concrete producing industry related to hot environments are discussed. Solutions are proposed, based on modern systems for temperature control of constituent materials and concrete during storage, production, placement and curing.

 

Mohamad Nagi, American University in Dubai, UAE

Nano particles boost the efficiency of construction materials-dreams and reality

Concrete shows its high performance if the specified strength- and deformation parameters are sustainable assured whilst requiring a minimum amount of energy. Countless research papers, published in the past view decades, show that this goal can be only achieved if a holistic, environmentally driven concept of industrial concrete production is adopted. The cementitious materials shoulder the “main burden” of this concept and thus comes as no surprise that the cement- and concrete companies are primarily looking for efficient binder manufacturing process technologies. This presentation refers to an important direction of these product development activities with the aim to evaluate the prospects for creating short- or medium term solutions by efficient application of nanoparticles on industrial scale. In this context, particular emphasis is placed on quantifying the contribution of each integral component of the complex nano-formulation for executing the aimed improvements in the overall performance of cementitious binder systems. Based on scientific and practical insights, technical and commercial conditions can be defined under which nanoparticles would enable a sustainable production of high quality concretes on industrial scale.

Dr.-Ing. Jürgen Oecknick holds Master Degrees in “Material Science” and “Non-Destructive Measurement Technique” and is Managing Director of the PSA Zurich Area GmbH, Uster, Switzerland. For 40 years he has now been committed to national-and multinational companies of the construction materials industry. His experience ranges from manufacturing and technical sales of cement-, dry-mix-, RMX- and precast concrete. During his career he worked for various companies, including Schwenk, Dornburger Cement and Holcim. His special interests relate to cement technology, specifically the practice of design & technical sales of ordinary cements, special binders, as well as white- and oil-well cements.

Juergen Oecknick, PSA Zurich Area GmbH, Zurich, Switzerland